Chris Lema and Focusing on the Customer of Your Customer

chris-lema-and-focusing-on-the-customer-of-your-customer

WordCamp Seattle!

This past weekend I presented at WordCamp Seattle, Helping Non Profits Change the World Through WordPress. I took the train up and spent four wonderful hours enjoying being in the passenger seat with easy access to coffee and wireless. For anyone traveling between Portland and Seattle, I definitely suggest taking the train.

I took the train up and spent four wonderful hours enjoying being in the passenger seat with easy access to coffee and wireless. For anyone traveling between Portland and Seattle, I definitely suggest taking the train.

While at WordCamp, I got the chance to connect with the keynote speaker, Chris Lema

Chris was at WordCamp Portland last time I presented but I didn’t get the chance to talk to him. This time, I made sure to introduce myself and get to know him a bit. He came to WordCamp Seattle with his daughter and he’s a really great guy. I got my picture taken with Chris and that’s one for the memory book.

I want to share what I learned from Chris’s keynote in Seattle. His talk was about how we’re not building websites for ourselves or for our own businesses; we are building websites for the customer of our customers. Business owners are quick to identify what they want and need out of their own website and as a web developer, I am ready to listen and deliver on what a business owner says they want. Chris suggests that until we identify a level outside of that, outside of the immediate need of the business and into the longer-term need of their customer, the website won’t fully deliver on the perceived objective.

chris-lema-and-focusing-on-the-customer-of-your-customer-1For example, a business owner comes to me and says, “Jocelyn, I need a website that will bring in leads.” Yes, we can do that. We can help create a plan and user interface that brings potential customers to your virtual door. My response to that business owner needs to be, “What is the first problem these customers are coming to you to fix? What are the steps you take to fill their needs?”

When I as a website developer am able to move outside of fixing the immediate and into the longer-term health of the website, I get really excited! It is wonderful to put the pieces together and see a business owner get great results.

Kristin Kinnamon talked about “Visibility, Usability, Schmoozability” and really reiterated how important it is that websites speak to the interests and needs of the customer before the site owner tries to push their own agenda. This is so important for web developers to remember because we want to be sure we aren’t jumping too quickly to what our customer wants on their site and miss what the customer’s customer needs to know to be a more informed purchase.

How can you know what the customer’s customer wants?

A great way to figure out what the customer’s customer might be thinking is to find out what questions are coming in. Anytime you have a support system, make sure they are relaying the problems that are coming up time and again.

I can’t find the link to . . .
I can’t find the information on . . .

Another good metric is to use Google Analytics to see which pages on your website are seeing the most visitors.

Where are people clicking?
What words did they use to find you?

The answers to those questions are priceless as you create your new site. Keep a running list of keywords and customer challenges and turn those into future blog posts.

 

Want to know more about the presenters at WordCamp? View my Facebook Live video about some of the other great things I learned.

 

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